At the Back of the North Wind

Words

In developing ‘At the Back of the North Wind’, Anton Ginzburg embarked on a three-part journey, commencing in the American North West (Astoria, Oregon), continuing to St. Petersburg and then to the White Sea, the site of the Soviet Gulag prison camps.

The body of work began with the artist’s observation that mythological patterns were undeniably woven into the fabric of everyday reality – specifically in the tension formed between the actual and the potential – and was expanded by the concept of Hyperborea, a mythical region that has been recently claimed to be discovered on the White Sea in northern Russia. Hyperborea was originally described by the ancient Greek writer Herodotus as the land of the Golden Age, and was thought to be a place of pure bliss, perpetual sunlight and eternal springtime. It has been an inspiration for early modernist thinkers such as Nietzsche and Madame Blavatskaya, while acting as a central theme to the early twentieth century St. Petersburg poetic tradition of Acmeism, dealing with the ‘golden age of man.’ Hyperborea continues to excite imagination of global media as the supposed birth-place of numerous cultures and nations.

All images © Anton Ginzburg

anton001anton002anton003anton004anton005anton006anton007anton008anton009anton010anton011anton012anton013