Applying Bondage Techniques To Nature

As a homage to the photographic work of Nobuyoshi Araki, Anna Reivilä explores the symbolism of Japanese bondage, regarding connections among people and the divine. In her series ‘Bond’, Reivilä applies the tied and knotted rope technique to elements of nature.

‘Bond’ appears as a combination of photographic, sculptural and performative elements. The Finnish photographer uses the traditional rope technique to bind rocks, trees and other elements of the landscape, presenting a series of images that are ultimately representative of transient objects. Reivilä makes a statement about the ephemeral relationship between humans and the natural world, and bridges Scandinavian nature and Japanese tradition, from which emerges an interesting cross-cultural dialogue. She explains that “using ropes as lines is [her] form of drawing,” which “creates interactions, making connections between the elements—a reinterpretation of the landscape.” With the Japanese word for bondage, kinbaku, literally translating to mean ‘beauty of tight binding’, the photographer creates a new sacred space for the natural materials that sits somewhere in between “being held together and being on the verge of breaking.”

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All images © Anna Reivilä

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